18:44

culture and look at zeitgeist. Where is culture swinging and where do I authentically intersect with that? For me, I’m great at connection and I love the technological age. I love how accessible information is. I love that with education at our fingertips. I love that it’s disrupting everything. It have the tremendous ability to […]

culture and look at zeitgeist. Where is culture
swinging and where do I authentically
intersect with that? For me, I’m great at connection and I love the
technological age. I love how
accessible information is. I love that with
education at our fingertips. I love that it’s
disrupting everything. It have the tremendous ability
to cause a distraction addiction and we need to be careful with
our children and with ourselves of how we consume. Now what does that mean?
It’s a very interesting topic. How do we consume in a way that
doesn’t hurt our mental health? That doesn’t cause
neural pathways of addiction and distraction addiction and that’s actually a
very fascinating topic. – I think the thing that a lot
of people are talking about, Simon Sinek has a video that’s
going viral on this right now. I think the question
becomes that we never do is what was the alternative?
– Mhmmm. – So, it’s one thing to say that
we’re addicted to this and we’re spending our time on this. My question is
that same human being, what would they have been
doing with this time– – Mhmmm.
– in 1989? Would they be
addicted to television? I had plenty of friends who
played 11 1/2 hours of Nintendo. – Yep. – You know we’re deploying our
angst against the medium and we’re not looking at
the human being enough. – Absolutely. – You know there’s a lot of,
there’s a lot of kids sitting in their room on their phone all
day long creating Instagram accounts and doing
stuff that would’ve been on the street doing something bad. Like this thought that it’s all
bad is very fascinating to me. I don’t know. I am unbelievably
pro-human being. – Yeah. – I mean back to just data
and behavior and patterns, like we’re still here.
– Yeah. – Like we’ve
had all the ability, when you think about what we could be doing to
each other negatively. We’ve all, there’s so much
carnage that could happen in one second and we don’t and so we
are scared of what we don’t know and I think that, I think that
I’m surprised by the collective cynicism of the of
the American market, for sure, around these
technologies but it makes a lot of sense to me because
every time there is a massive communication shift we
are very cynical of it. – Yeah. And we’re frightened. – We’re scared.
– But what I love is the Millenials already
have the antidote. So they’re already a
product of the culture of being, having the ability to do this
and look at their screen and what are they telling us? We want experiences,
we don’t want things. – Of course.
– That’s the antidote. We get to get out
and have experiences. – Guys, this is nothing
compared to VR in 20 years. – Mhmmm. – People are
gonna sit in their home. You’re never
gonna see them again. They’re gonna put their contact
lenses on and they’ll be gone. This is, I’m being, this is it. Be happy that they’re
actually out and about looking at the phone ’cause of
the San Diego in a pod and they’re not coming out.
– Right. Yeah. – Andy? Really though
because by the way,– – Yeah? – to your point, and I
see where you’re going. It’s why we’ve
always loved reading books, and watching movies. We need to escape–
– Yeah. – for our mental health.
– Mhmmm. – That’s what this is. It becomes the
alternative universe. The much more extreme version
of that is gonna be the virtual reality world when they
can absolutely in 20 years technology put in
contact lenses and be somewhere. – I always add in caveat–
– Go ahead. – a lot of people talk
to me about mindfulness and, you know, about
being in your head. It’s actually not about,
we do need an escape. – Yes. – Our minds will
run us, they hijack us. – Yeah. Yep. – And so a lot of us use
escape so that we don’t, so that we can escape our minds. I look at our bodies
as an amazing machine. And it’s an amazing machine, our brain is
actually not the driver, it’s the steering wheel. So who’s the driver? I think it’s our observer. When we get so
caught up in our mind we’re desperate for an escape. For me that’s when mindfulness
tools come into play with how we interface
with everything. You have to give yourself a
break from your mind that’s healthy habit and not
just constantly a distraction. – Jewel, just because
you’re so deep in this. This is what I want
to ask you for me. I’m being selfish now. I don’t know the answer. I’m curious for
your perspective. I don’t need an escape.
– Mhmmm. – I don’t want to escape. I’m super duper pumped.
– That’s good. – Like I mean it. Like, I’m even
scared to do meditation, this is real because I’m so
happy with my mental state that I don’t anything that
rejiggers anything ’cause I never need an
escape from anything. I’m super it’s true, And. I deal with plenty of stresses
and things of that nature. I don’t know, I like it. It’s fine, it’s part
of the, I don’t know. What do you think about that? – I don’t know what
to think about that. But I know you
can trust yourself. – Yeah, and?
Have you seen that? How do you think about that? It’s just interesting to me that I don’t gravitate
towards an escape at all. – That’s awesome. – I don’t want to, I want to
stay in my head all the time. – Yeah?
– It’s cozy. – Uh-huh. What’s it like in there?
– Fucking awesome. – Yeah?
(group laughter) That’s good.
– Alright, And. One more time.
One last one?

16:43

– That’s a good one. – I love it. I’m in control of it. I’ve always really welcomed it. I’ve lived my life with transparency. I hide nothing. That said, I always honor– – We love Jewel. (group laughter) You’re giving all the answers that nobody, nobody else says. Yeah and what’s weird is it’s […]

– That’s a good one. – I love it.
I’m in control of it. I’ve always really welcomed it. I’ve lived my
life with transparency. I hide nothing. That said, I always honor–
– We love Jewel. (group laughter) You’re giving all the answers
that nobody, nobody else says. Yeah and what’s weird is it’s one thing say it that
came and grew from it. You were real, real
famous when it came along so it’s an even more
impressive answer. You know, I was a byproduct and
benefited from the transparency and grew from there.
– Yeah. – But for you to
be where you were and love it speaks to
that rare authenticity. – Well, I also was able, that’s
funny I was put in a college textbook from when
the grassroot marketers, one of the four founders of
grassroots marketing online. – Sure. – It wasn’t because of me.
It was my fans. And it was the early days of the
internet but it was the reason I broke through grunge. – But your fans, I was there. I was doing the
Wine Library thing. It’s why I was so excited. We talked a little bit
about this the other day. Your fans got there and
give a crap because of you and then they took over. What my fans do now is insane
the level of love but it starts with I love them first.
– Yeah. – You have to love them first. – Yeah, music comes
second in all honesty. I think people
and what I’ve been, it’s just been incredible. I have no middleman. I get to talk to my fans
directly and tell them who I am. I don’t have a journalist going, “You know the truth about
Jewel was blah blah blah blah.” And it’s not true. I actually get to
tell people what’s true. I get to have that direct
relationship and not to mention I should be a gift in, we’re all
a gift in each other’s lives. If I’m not a gift
in the life of my fans, I am not doing my job. This isn’t all about me and so
the way technology is evolved it’s much easier
for me to watch my fans, see how their
families are doing, encourage them to be
supporting one another. I love it.
– Amazing. Andy?

8:39

– Hey Gary. I’m wondering what you think of Snapchat and their recent way of selling their Spectacles, the glasses with the vending machine and how you think that plays in their marketing strategy? Thanks so much. – Oliver, Snapchat Spectacles. – I think they’re kind of brilliant. I think they took something that Google […]

– Hey Gary. I’m wondering what you think of
Snapchat and their recent way of selling their Spectacles, the
glasses with the vending machine and how you think that plays
in their marketing strategy? Thanks so much. – Oliver, Snapchat Spectacles. – I think they’re
kind of brilliant. I think they took something that
Google spent so much time and energy on but effectively was pretty nerdy and
they made it cool. – Yep. – Pop-up stores and
vending machines are social media worthy. – The distribution’s been crazy. – Yeah, exactly and if you
only have a small amount of them then make it special.
– That’s right. – So I saw a bunch on social
media last night about a store in New York that just popped up. – Yep.
– Yeah, I think it’s cool. – I think it’s a big play. I think it could be maybe the
saving grace move to their IPO. – Sure. – If you think about what
Instagram’s replication of a lot of their functionality has done
it’s created a scenario where there’s little more skeptics
talking about Snapchat’s growth. – Sure. – A lot of people
talking about their decline. – Instagram sucks
out the oxygen out of the room with stories. – So it becomes
Snap and to play, to me what’s most interesting
is Snapchat is the first social network that feels like a brand.
– Mhmmm. – You know, Snapchat
feels as much to me as Under Armour and Soul Cycle–
– Yep. – as it does Facebook or
Instagram and that crossover from just utility social network
to overall brand I feel like this captured that moment and if
they can pull that all the way through well then they
really have something. – And they really made it where you are the media, right?
– 100%. – And so that was part of
this exciting brand and then the filters and the tools
and the creativity– – And then you
think about the live. All they have to do is add an
update that allows that be live streaming and now all of a
sudden you got a whole thing. I’m pretty bullish on it. It’s early, I do agree that
they’ve made it cool what was $1500 and not cool from Google,
three years ago so we’ll see. Evan, from me from afar, continues to deploy
LA brand behavior in a San Francisco,
Silicon Valley world in a very good way. – Yep and they also making big
steps to be a media company. So you saw where they stopped
rev sharing and started buying content now as a
Netflix would do– – The garden walls of the
internet are popping up. – Yeah.
– Let’s keep it going. – [Dunk] Next
question is from John.

9:58

– Gary, Gary, Gary, Gary Vaynerchuk! Hey you remember when episode three you said it should be your life dream to get your question on my show? Gary, it’s my life dream, man. Please, India! Come on, girl. Get me on the show. Just kidding, India, you’re awesome. I love you. Hey, I’m really glad […]

– Gary, Gary,
Gary, Gary Vaynerchuk! Hey you remember when episode
three you said it should be your life dream to get your
question on my show? Gary, it’s my life dream, man. Please, India!
Come on, girl. Get me on the show. Just kidding,
India, you’re awesome. I love you. Hey, I’m really glad
you didn’t get fired. (laughs) We were worried,
we were worried. Vayner Nation was worried. Hey, DRock, can our cameras
get together and focus? (laughs) I’m Zeek Fit Freak coming
from you Valparaiso, Indiana. Cornfields and everything.
Oh God, help me. I need a mountain. Somebody get me a mountain. I’m a personal trainer
and a lifestyle manager. Ooh, that’s a new one.
Lifestyle manager. Ooh, what does that even mean? Well, I’ll tell you but
let’s just get to the question. Okay? No but really, I love what you’re saying
about self-awareness. It’s one of the number one
things I talk to my clients about, one of the number one
things that is changed my life for the better in so many
different ways but being truly self-aware I know that what my
best talents obviously is the energy that
I bring to the table. And I’m telling you,
I’ll bring this energy to the table
wherever I’m at. Okay? Call me out there, right now. I’m gonna drive out there.
You think I won’t? I will bring this energy, Gary. And I know this will be really
great for brands but I’m trying to brand my own thing
on the side, right? So the question is
how do you harness an emotion that comes through the energy that I develop and give and
share with other people? How can I monetize that online? I’ve been working on it and
I could really use your help. Thank you so much, Gary. I love you, man. Hey, DRock link in
the description. Ooh, get right
there, right there. Lift life guys and
go New York Jets! Woo! – Jason, what are
you doing with that? (group laughter) – Wow, it’s like Jim Carrey. – He’s really, really, that’s
got some interesting charisma. What do you think? How does he
monetize all that energy? – Well, here’s the thing,
we both know online is a great way to get attention. It’s a little bit challenging
sometimes to monetize. Obviously, the
CPMs are very low. It’s hard to get the brands,
that’s why big agencies like your’s exist and other
ones around town. They have the brand
relationships, so they’ll be some opportunity to join
these networks of stars, you know about those.
– Yep. – And that’s a fine way to do it
but I think building your brand online and then
increasing your prices offline. So if he’s a trainer and he’s
got five clients and they’re all paying $50 an hour, what
I always find is people are afraid to raise their prices
and lose clients, right? So if he keeps growing and he’s
that good, he should be able to double his price. Then double your price, then
double your price and maybe have five people who are paying $400 a session where
that kind of a thing. So be good at
whatever your skill is and then keep raising your price. – Products, services, content.
– Yeah. – There’s only 4 to 5 things
that one can do to monetize. – Sure. Yeah. – You got great energy, you get
attention, you get you build a base and then you can
do a lot of things. You could sell
them stuff, right? – Sure.
– Make a product, yep. You can sell a T-shirt like you
can sell them a physical thing. – Yeah.
– You can create a service. If you train people and
it’s 50 bucks an hour then it’s 100 and 200,
you can be in a place where you as a personality
gets monetized. You sign a book deal,
you sell a lot of them. You speak for 100 bucks then
1,000 bucks then 5,000 bucks. You create a
scalable content play. You put out something that is,
you know, you put your classes on Udemy and all
these kind of things. – Yeah. – You collect, Creative
Collective and things like that so you and I can give
you like a lot of things. But the truth is only five or
six things that are out there. – It’s always the rookie mistake
when I talk to somebody and say what’s your business model? And they say well, it’s going to
be advertising and subscriptions and then we’re gonna sell things
and then we’re gonna sell the data and they list 18 things. It’s like, whoa,
whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. The great companies,
Uber, take a percentage. Tumblr, advertising. Google, ad networks, right? It’s very rare that you see even
a big company, Apple selling hardware, goes into a
second or third business line. You have to pick
one and master it. – Go deep. – And just master it because
you know how hard it is to get advertising and content to work. You have to be the number one
person in your category and you have to very tight relationships and you have to
deliver for those advertisers. On a product basis, people who
are making great products and selling them at a high profit
like Apple, man, it’s hard to compete against
people like that. You have to be
exceptional in this nature. – The other thing for a lot of
you that are watching that I think will be valuable
is try to do everything. Give a free speech. Create a content e-book. Go try to get a publishing deal. Try different things. – And see which ones pop.
– Yeah. – And which one you enjoy.
– Yeah. I think so. – That’s critical to because
if you don’t enjoy being in a service business and having
customers, you can’t do it because you’re gonna
hate your customers. – Oh my gosh, all my
tech friends as you know– – Yes. – Like from what I came from,
they’re like you like this? You like having–
– (sighs) Brutal. – I’m like I like it ’cause
I know what it’s building for me long term.
– Yeah. – You know like nobody in tech wants the unscalable
nature of this. – Of a service business.
– Nobody. – No.
– Nobody. – But if you look at it, you
have real clients and look at the knowledge you’re getting. You have all these Millenials
out here and they’re different, aren’t they?
– I don’t think so. – Maybe different
than Gen X’ers. – You know what, I think
that’s a popular conversation. I think people pretty basic.
– Yeah? – They the same tried-and-true
things which is they have some balance of their
wants and needs. I just think that
they have more power. – They do. – They have more power because the world has
gone in their favor. They’re 20-something in a
time where 20-somethings are respected by 40, 50 and
60-somethings around business because business
is being done here. And they know it better. – Do you get the sense when
they’re looking at you that they’re like, “I can be him
and I can do what he does.” – I hope not because then
they’re fucking stupid. – Yeah. I think I’m looking
around the room, I think a lot of them are like
I could be in charge. – You know what’s funny,
I hope they feel that way but it won’t happen.
(group laughter) – It takes time. – Alright, India, let’s go.
(group laughter) Hadi Yousef here.
Off of your inspiration,

3:37

My name is Bryan AKA MindofBun, I’m on the app Musical.ly and I have a following of over 600,000 people. Not only that but I’m one of four Musical.ly reps that live in New York City. So my question is I don’t know what to do next. I feel like I’m stuck in a plateau. […]

My name is Bryan AKA MindofBun,
I’m on the app Musical.ly and I have a following of
over 600,000 people. Not only that but I’m one of
four Musical.ly reps that live in New York City. So my question is
I don’t know what to do next. I feel like I’m
stuck in a plateau. I don’t know what to do next. I love making these videos,
not only on Musical.ly but I’m also pushing
everybody to YouTube, too. I ask this question because
I have friends who have less followers than me who have
managers and people who I know that have millions of fans who
don’t even have managers or they don’t even know what to do. So, what should I do
next with this following? Do I go out there and look
for companies or brand deals or should I link up with the
manager or what should I do? I put my business email out
there and I’m not always getting emails every day or something. I am patient, I do wait but
lately I just trying to figure out a way to get a source of
income from this because, again, I do love doing this, I love
doing this but at the end of the day I still have my mom
harassing me saying A, are you gonna get
a job or this and that? And yeah, so Gary
what should I do? – Jason, it’s fun to have
you here with this question. Good job by you guys curating
because again we lived through early bloggers getting famous–
– Sure. – then Twitter was really
the first preview to this– – Sure. – where both of us were lucky
enough to be one of those 100, 150 people that
everybody was following. – Sure. – What kind of advice do you
give to, I’m paying a lot of attention to the
Musical.ly stars. – Sure.
– This is the youngest generation of stars
we’ve ever seen. You’re making a joke of
VaynerMedia being young,– – I know. – We’re talking about 9,
10, 11, 12-year-old stars. – Yeah. – Like it’s, it’s Nickelodeon
up in Musical.ly right out. What’s your advice for this? – Well, I mean what
is the goal here? Does the person want to be, do they actually
have any raw talent? Are they actually a musician? Are they actually a singer or
are they just kind of becoming popular for doing– – Do you think that’s possibly
becoming just talent in itself? – That’s a good question. – Like you said that and
I’m debating it myself. – Right. Do you
actually have a skill? So what I think is adding skills to your repertoire like
that can only help you. So if learn an instrument,
if you actually learn to sing then you can kind of
take it to the next level. So when you saw Justin Bieber
on YouTube it was like, “Yeah, he’s a YouTube star but
he actually had core talent.” – No, he was a real talent.
– He was a real talent. Then you look at
somebody like King Bach. – Yes.
– On Vine,– – Yes. – he was the number
one guy for a while. Probably still is.
He actually is funny. – He’s a real comedian.
– He’s a real comedian. – Actor.
– Actor. – Yes.
– He’s a comedic actor. – Yes. – So I think adding skills when
you’re a young person is one thing that this
generation got backwards. – That’s a good point. – They go get the
fame and it’s great. You can hit that lightning in
a bottle but get that skill you can, it can never be
taken away from you. – Yeah, I think networking. I think just even asking this question like, for example,
I’m interested. I’m spending more time in
Musical.ly so let’s get this kid into my office, I want to
meet him for 20 minutes. And you just need to do
that over and over, right? – Yeah. – How many people have been able
to get to you and met for 15 or 30 minutes just by pounding you on social and email
through the last decade? Give me a rough estimate of
numbers because I know– – Over a thousand.
– That’s it. – Over a thousand,
it takes time. – You, right and some people
they email you one time and you gave them 15 minutes and some
people have emailed you 37,000 times and you’ve
never talked to them. – Exactly.
– That’s the punchline. – I look at the quality like I look for people with
skill but that’s me. – But you know this, it’s a
subjective moment in time. – Sure. – Like at that moment
it felt like, right? – Yeah.
– I mean it’s a crap shoot. – Yeah but you know what? It’s a numbers game, if you,
one of the things is I had, I have a portfolio company that
raised money from seven people and they’re like we can’t raise any more money,
it’s not working. I’m like well, how’d
you get the first seven? They’re like well, we
met with a ton of people. I said how many
people did you meet? They said 15. I was like so you can raise
money from 50% of the people you meet with and now you met with
another five, you didn’t get an investor so you’re quitting?
– Soft. – So soft.
– Soft! – You got to do at least 50
meetings and what you do is you take notes after every meeting
and you ask people candidly why did you pass on investing? The way you can help me,
I understand you’re passing, can you just tell me the truth? – Interesting. – Be candid with me
and tell me why I suck. – I love that.
– Or tell me what I need to work on.
You know what? People will do it if you give
them permission to speak freely. – Love it. India,
let’s move it forward. By the way, I’m serious,
I want to meet the kid. Make it happen. – [Jason] Hey-o!
– Manu.


Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /home3/ethan/public_html/sites/askgaryveeshow/wp-content/themes/asktheme/partials/question.php on line 3
8:52

I’m currently a physical therapy student at the University of New Mexico. I am a huge fan of your work and I am so grateful for all of the value that you bring all of us and I appreciate you taking my question. As a future business owner, I’ll be deploying a lot of your […]

I’m currently a physical therapy student at the
University of New Mexico. I am a huge fan
of your work and I am so grateful for all of the value that you bring all of us and I appreciate you
taking my question. As a future business owner,
I’ll be deploying a lot of your strategies to
advertise for my business. My question for you is which
platform do you spend most of your time on these days? Thanks for answering. – Which platform? I mean I think, what’s his name? – [Dunk] Zach. – Zach, first of all,
thanks for the love. Zach, I think
the plot, you know, I think it’s
running the gamut. Instagram, Snapchat
I still continue use Twitter. I don’t think people understand
like Twitter is still the one place to have unbelievable
engagement and I truly believe so much of my world is
predicated on engagement. That being said, Snapchat’s
the place where when I actually reply, I just get so many god
damn, you know, people go crazy. It’s funny, I love the way the
UI and UX of Twitter, I can just get to so many more people than
all like the pressing waiting. The speed in which Snapchat
engagement works doesn’t allow me to do as many as I’d like to
which is disappointing because the upside of engaging on somebody’s
Snapchat is holy shit. Whereas on Twitter
it’s like thanks and that’s a very big
different reaction. I would say
Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram. That’s where I’m spending most
my time and I think this is a great opportunity for me to
answer a question so many have been asking which is Instagram
Stories or Snapchat Stories? The answer is both. All four of those platforms have
enormous attention for me and so I continue to focus on
them and engage and create and pound and work with my team on our
strategies and so all four platforms are extremely
important to me as the pillar and foundations and so there’s not one that is you
know is dominating. I’m sure if I looked at my time
of usage, one is greater than the other depending on how
I use them but in my mind from a strategy standpoint all four are
extremely important and I think for most of you all four
of those and including the LinkedIn’s of the world and Periscope and the
Facebook Lives scenario. I mean there’s just so much opportunity for us
to story tell and grind. I just think people need to put
in the work and I think they all bring different value for
different reasons and that’s why I use them. Facebook has
ungodly reach potential. Nothing is remotely close
to Facebook’s capability to replicate a
television like platform. Instagram is just depth of attention especially
with stories now. It’s done extremely well just a
month ago or eight weeks ago I was talking about being concerned of where
Instagram plays. I think the Stories
feature was a monstrous move. Snapchat for the 16 to 25 to 28-year-old demo is the game and super important for so
many of us out there. And Twitter is the only place
where you can listen at scale and engage and
create that conversation. I mean I don’t know where
everybody was last night during the debate but I have a funny
feeling it wasn’t Instagram, Facebook and Snapchat and so
that is the water cooler of our society and there’s a
lot of opportunity there. May be for not as much talking
but is the one place I would listen over any other platform.

1 2 3 21