2:20

But I’m a cabinet designer and I have the opportunity to basically go work for a very high-end firm and try to continue to do my own stuff. And become a rep, all of these opportunities are coming all at once and I’m trying to figure out the best way to balance them all without […]

But I’m a cabinet designer
and I have the opportunity to basically go work for a
very high-end firm and try to continue to do my own stuff. And become a rep, all of these
opportunities are coming all at once and I’m trying to figure
out the best way to balance them all without basically–
– Burning out. – [Candice] suffocating myself.
Yes, exactly, burning out. – So let’s work backwards. And this is what
everybody needs to do. It’s so easy to make decisions
when you have clarity on what you want to happen. And what you
want to happen is always short-term
and long-term. So, talk to me about what would you like
to happen in the macro from a financial,
work-life balance and the kind of things that
you want. It’s just choices. Right Candice,
life is very simple. Because I chose that I want to
own the New York Jets my work-life balance is not as good
as it would be if I was okay with where I am now, right? I don’t know if you saw
the news of the PureWow deal. I wouldn’t be buying this big
media company because I’m rich enough already if I wanted
to be just rich. Right? No, I want to buy a football
team thus I have to be on the offense at 41 years old
like I have nothing and I’m 20. Got it?
So, the biggest thing– – [Candice] No,
I totally understand. – Help me understand the
financial situation of all this. Do you want to
make lots of money? Like your financial situation. Do you have to make the money? Where are you in
your life with family? How much vacation
time do you want to do? And what you want to end up? Work backwards.
Give me some data. – [Candice] So, right now
we’re basically an empty nester. Both of our
children are in college. – That’s huge. Gives you a lot of flexibility.
– [Candice] Very huge. – Yep. – [Candice] Yes, ideally like
my big picture scheme is I would like to get into house flipping and doing airBnBs
and stuff like that. Because again, being a cabinet
designer I look at all these people that flip houses around
here and go I know I could do that so much better.
– I love that. And I think it’s going to be
a great market until the real estate market, you just gotta
not get caught when you’ve got momentum going in two or
three years of having too much inventory that you’re sitting on
and then the market gets soft. So long as there’s not a
collapse of the housing or Wall Street market, you’re going
to cruise and as long as your conservative and don’t get
too big for your britches that you’re doing and
buying and flipping. Don’t overextend yourself even
in a crash as long as you’re playing with house
money, you’ll be fine. – [Candice] Right. That’s part of my problem in
looking at the big picture is is right now we’re a
little bit in debt. Again, if I bust my tail
for the next year I could get us completely out of debt and– – So, let’s, let’s,
let’s, let’s start right there. Immediately do that. I can tell by your
energy and your vibe, work your face off
for the next year and get yourself out of debt. Take all the jobs.
Do all the things. Punt everything
leisure right now, do that. That’s just a good idea.
– [Candice] Right. – I mean it.
– [Candice] And then– – I mean it.
– [Candice] Oh, I believe it. – And by the way,
one year is nothing. DRock and I were just sitting
in a hotel in Vegas saying, “Hey, this DailyVee
thing is going to be big.” It was five seconds ago. That was one year ago.
One year goes real fast. Debt compounds. There’s no reason to have it
if you’re that close and your energy feels so good that
you want to do work anyway, it’s like eat that crow
for one year, period, no doubt. 100%. And be smart. Speed up the process to
nine months by not buying eight dollar lettuce
instead of six dollar lettuce. Like flip some
shit in your garage. All that stuff. Just make that your
core number one thing, definitely do that.
That’s number one. – [Candice] Yeah, no,
I was waiting for you to drop the eBay thing.
– Yep. – [Candice] ‘Cause I was
telling my husband ’cause he’s really good. He likes old school
cars and stuff like that. He knows that stuff like back
of his hand and I’m like okay, you need to figure that out. – Yes. Yes, yes, yes. – [Candice] Thrift
stores and stuff like that. – Yes, okay.
Do that. – [Candice] Yeah, so that’s my
big picture thing is trying to figure how to get there and also
because once we get out of debt, I’m trying to figure
out how to balance that. Do I go take out loans?
– No. Let me tell you what I would do. Let me tell you what I’d do. The housing market’s been good
for long enough here’s my advice as if you were my sister. Crush your debt, go crazy. Your husband if he’s deeply
knowledgeable about automobiles will be blown away and you live
in Atlanta which means year wide garage sales and things of that
nature because the warm weather. He’s by accident gonna make 20, 30, $40,000. It’s gonna happen,
I’m telling you right now. Now that’s based on if he works like I do
which is all-in, right? If we works less then he’ll
make $5,000 instead of $30,000. Clear your debt,
year one, year two, 2018, work your face
off and save money. Right? Save and then
whatever you save, let’s say you got $48,000, great that means that’s
your down payment and then get mortgage on your
rest for your first flip. Got it?
– [Candice] Right. – 24 months of
eating shit to be able to eat caviar for
the rest of your life. – [Candice] Yeah ’cause that’s
my big picture is I want to be able to when “retire” and
I say that very loosely because I don’t want to work
for a paycheck anymore. I just want to work
because I enjoy working. – The best way to do
that is to go extreme. Everybody’s going to try to drag
that out over eight years and take a vacation here, make $5,000 on eBay
instead of $20,000. Work one of the jobs,
not two of the jobs. The best way to do it is,
you’re never promised tomorrow. Even though I
talk about patience, I’m aware that you’re
not promised tomorrow. When you can do
something, do it. So crush the next
24 months, clean debt, get 10, 15, 20, 50, $80,000 in savings whatever it ends
up being, that is your deposit. Get the mortgage for whatever
else you can and do the flip and if that doesn’t get you the
house for your first flip then eat another pile of shit in 2019
and now you’ve got $90,000 for the deposit and
then you put that down. Got it?
– [Candice] Oh yeah. – That’s it.
It’s clouds and dirt. It’s going all-in for the
next 24 months and not being glamorous so that you can be glamorous for the
rest of the way. The problem is everybody hedges
and then they’re half-pregnant the whole 50 years. – [Candice] No, and
that’s what I don’t want to be. I’m like you, I’m about
the same age and I’m like okay, it’s full speed ahead now
because I don’t wake up in 20 years or 10 years and go
ugh, we’re still here. Really? – Attack, attack all three jobs. Don’t watch a single
thing don’t go anywhere, work for the next 24
months, you will win. – [Candice] Gotcha. – All right, love you.
See ya. – [Candice] Alright,
thank you, sir. – Bye-bye.
– [Candice] Bye. – That was really good.
(group laughter)

21:35

– Gary, what’s going on? It’s Captain Cory from CaptCory.tv and the Captain’s Vlog on YouTube. I’m in the back of the airplane because it’s more quiet but I got a couple questions for you. First off, Gary aside for your incredible interpersonal skills, what would you say is the most important leadership quality that […]

– Gary, what’s going on? It’s Captain Cory
from CaptCory.tv and the Captain’s Vlog on YouTube. I’m in the back of the airplane
because it’s more quiet but I got a couple
questions for you. First off, Gary aside for your
incredible interpersonal skills, what would you say is the most
important leadership quality that you deploy amongst
those that you lead? And the second part
of that question, what are two important
leadership qualities that we as young leaders can develop
that’ll make us more effective as leaders and have a greater
influence and make a bigger difference amongst those? Appreciate all you do.
Love the show. I’m not watching as much any
more ’cause I’m grinding and hustling but love it.
Love what you do, man. If you ever need
a ride too, man, let me know. – That’s good. That’s my big thesis
by the way, Oliver. Unlike a lot of people, I actually want my audience
of people to decline– – Sure. – because I want to inspire
people to actually go do. – Right. – The amount of
reading all our books, watching all our stuff,
that’s fine and I like that. – Yep. My tagline’s always
been I get shit done. Just get it done. – You’ve been a successful
leader in your companies, what’s the biggest thing
that has really worked for you? – I think being humanistic which
is a word that I don’t think many people, especially
in this country, use. But there’s a real value
to putting humans first. And it sounds so trite but
there’s a real value to having empathy and putting humans
first and looking at them from a perspective that you can
say, how do I help you grow? What is both this sympathy parts
and the nourishment parts that are going to help you realize
your potential as a person? And I’ve started
seven companies now and made a lot of mistakes. Human resources is the hardest
thing to do at scaling a company because I always make
the joke they are neither a resource nor human,
human resources. And so–
– That’s why the head of mine is called Chief Heart
Officer, Claude. Claude is the number two person in this company
and everybody knows it. It is the foundation at
Vayner because we sell people. – Yep, exactly and so, I mean
you’re in a service business, in a content business so
that makes sense and so I think taking a lens of humanism has
been the biggest gift for me. It’s one of the reasons
I moved to Iceland. You have a humanistic society that doesn’t punish people
for their weaknesses. – I like that. – You have no poverty,
you have no homelessness. You have reform
instead of prison. Big, important things especially
coming from a place like Mississippi where I was born. You look at that and
that’s a place where people are not
treated like humans. There are systems in place. I remember with American Express
we made a movie called “Spent” about payday lenders in America. Talk about your
audience and the pains. That’s $1 trillion business
in America that is parasitic. – Yep. – It adds no value to
the system whatsoever. In Iceland, a human human right is to be able to
access your money. – Sure. – Here we have the basic
principles of our economy are inaccessible in my hometown to
80% of the people have to go to a payday lender and a check
cashing place and spend a percentage of their income just to take just to be able
to spend their money. That is not humanistic. That is counter to anything that will help a system
grow and evolve. – I couldn’t agree
more with the human– – Not to rant about
payday lenders but fuck– – but it’s a valid point and
I think from my standpoint it’s listening and
it’s self-awareness. I think the biggest mistake
charismatic CEOs make is they try to fake the funk and act
like they know everything. – Mhmmm. – I always feel like I think
I know everything and lot of you leave
comments about ego. Only ’cause I stay in my lane. There’s a very narrow
world where I’m very good. I tend to never go out of it. You notice how
I have social media and business people
on the show. This is not a healthcare expert. We’re not talking about
hair dying activities. This is not, nobody’s gonna be
on the show talking about how to raise cattle because I’m not
gonna put myself in a position where I do not know what
the fuck I am talking about. – Right. – And so being all-in on what
you know and then being very empathetic and listening and deploying humility against
the things you don’t know. People pick up on
that real, real, real fast. Because when you come across
somebody that works for you that does know the thing that
your bullshitting about and you bullshit it,
you just lost a winner. – Yep.
– You’ve just lost a winner. – It’s about building
that trusted relationship at every level of all of this. – I got to get the
hell out of here.

16:36

So why did you do it? Did you have a deeper purpose? Did you not want to let yourself down or let someone else down? – I don’t want to let anyone down. Nothing down. – And then how, what did you do specifically? What steps did you do when you were at your lowest […]

So why did you do it? Did you have a deeper purpose? Did you not want to let yourself
down or let someone else down? – I don’t want to
let anyone down. Nothing down. – And then how, what
did you do specifically? What steps did you do when
you were at your lowest moment. – Yep, let’s do it. During that point,
what did I do? Is I did what I preach to all of
you which is I put in the work. I gave up all my weekends and
holidays in high school because I knew I had to pay that price
because I wasn’t gonna do the I’m gonna go to school, meet
some good kids at Stanford and Brown and Ivy League school. Make some relationships and
that’s gonna be my springboard. I was gonna start with no
relationships and in the gutter and I was gonna have to prove it
and I would have to show up and meet everybody like I did in my
30s but in my teens and 20s, I was gonna have to work. And so what I did was to the
extreme of anybody I’ve met that had options, some people lose
their father, mother, welfare but anybody who had some
options, I punted every leisure activity in my life. Nothing, no weekends,
no vacations, zero, nothing. Nothing. Like we’re making jokes about
the seven days, I didn’t take a single, and by the
way, it’s my truth. I didn’t take a
single vacation day. Never and I’m sure you
worked on your side hustle, I just love you and
I didn’t want to razz you. None. Zero, zero, zero. All my high school friends,
gone, because I wasn’t around. All my college friends,
post-college, gone. I’d see them a little bit. I love those guys but gone. Girlfriends, nothing. All-in. So what did I do? I worked. I worked to such an extreme
level that when I push you on work, I don’t even ask you to
do 50% of what I did and I guarantee you’ll fucking win.

13:53

Was it your team? – Next. Stop right there. My mom and dad. That’s who my who were. My mom was building my self-esteem about me. I’ll never forget, I opened the door for a woman in McDonald’s when I was like nine, my mom, Andy, you don’t want to hang? – [Andy] I got […]

Was it your team? – Next. Stop right there. My mom and dad. That’s who my who were. My mom was building my
self-esteem about me. I’ll never forget, I opened the
door for a woman in McDonald’s when I was like nine, my mom,
Andy, you don’t want to hang? – [Andy] I got to run.
– You got real work. – [Andy] I got to run.
– I got it. Real work, I’m excited. My mom made that out to be the greatest that a
human had ever done. She accentuated, she blew up,
she overemphasized great things, which made me a good person. And my dad, my dad instilled
unbelievable hard work ethic. My mom did as well. Word is bond. You know,
provided for our family. Came here with zero. I look up to him so much for
that struggle so my what was the struggles early on in my
childhood, my who was my parents, who are showing me
through their actions not only their words what to do. – Who was it that you worked


Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /home3/ethan/public_html/sites/askgaryveeshow/wp-content/themes/asktheme/partials/question.php on line 3
6:44

– What’s up GaryVee? Coach Kozak here and I just like to get your thoughts on friendships of a fellow hustler, grinder out here in the shed 24/7 working. – I like the shed. – And I want to know at this point in time in your life and your career do even make time– […]

– What’s up GaryVee? Coach Kozak here and I just
like to get your thoughts on friendships of a fellow hustler,
grinder out here in the shed 24/7 working.
– I like the shed. – And I want to know at this
point in time in your life and your career do
even make time– – I want a shed. – just to have those couple of
friends that are always nagging me throughout the day. Asking me if I’ve seen
this TV show or that TV show. I’m mean at what point are just
being rude or do you have to just tell these guys to, “Hey I don’t have
time for friends today.” – Look I love my friends and
I actually wish I spent more time with my friends. I mean the fact of the matter is
during the day outside of Jets friends during Jets season
I don’t communicate with anybody about anything until that day’s
wrapped up and I’ll catch up. You know, I think way too many
people are trying to be cool. What the name? Jonathan?
– [Dunk] Joshua. – Joshua, I think too many
people are trying to be cool and being like, “Yo, I don’t got
time for fucking ‘House of Cards’,” or like
following the life. I don’t think there’s any, ever a time to like
rag on your friends. I think in my mind I rag on my
friends because but to actually I want to be polite
and I want to give them love. I think it’s super important
to be empathetic to a million different lifestyles and if
anything I’m trying to work hard as a matter of fact I think
I emailed Tyler the other day and I think I’m seeing a bunch
of my high school friends in the city next Thursday
or this Thursday. You know, I don’t know. I mean like they’re your
friends for a reason, right? I think a lot of people are
struggling with the definition between friends
and acquaintances. I think acquaintances that want
you to watch “Game of Thrones” and play fucking Madden I think
if you really want something bad are probably an interesting thing to cut out or
navigate around. I think friends you need to be
there for all the time and try to fight for those relationships
because that brings as much value as building the
biggest business in the world.

2:48

DRock or whoever is editing this please hook me up with my Twitter handle, I appreciate that. My question to you Gary is I’ve just headhunted for position at Facebook but I’m currently running a small but growing digital marketing agency in the UK called KPS Digital Marketing do I stop what I’m doing with […]

DRock or whoever is editing
this please hook me up with my Twitter handle,
I appreciate that. My question to you Gary is I’ve
just headhunted for position at Facebook but I’m currently
running a small but growing digital marketing agency in the
UK called KPS Digital Marketing do I stop what I’m doing with my
agency and get some one else to manage it and then go and
work at Facebook to get the experience or do I ignore the
position at Facebook and carry on hustling and doing what
I’m doing with my growing digital marketing agency? – [Gary] Daniel,
that’s a personal question. – I appreciate your answer. – That’s a personal question. I can’t answer that for you. You need to know who you
are and what you’re about. My intuition is anybody that
even questions to leave their own business to
go work at a company should go work at that company. Cory Gregory here just
pulled up to the gym,

8:13

I’m a dad and I’m wondering what’s one of the biggest life events or especially events that you had to miss (child babbling) due to your commitment to the work but how’d you (child babbling) and how did you overcome? Thanks man. – You know, Ernest, first of all, that what was remarkable and about […]

I’m a dad and I’m wondering
what’s one of the biggest life events or especially events that
you had to miss (child babbling) due to your commitment to
the work but how’d you (child babbling) and how
did you overcome? Thanks man. – You know, Ernest, first of
all, that what was remarkable and about as
adorable as it gets. Ernest, you know I haven’t
missed anything, I missed some you know school plays. I haven’t missed any, no birth,
I would never miss a birthday. There hasn’t been
a signature event. They’re seven and four. There hasn’t been, you
know, Xander’s bris. That would be insane to me to
miss anything of that nature. I guess we all have different
scale of what’s important. There’s dads out there who
would never in the world miss a baseball game of
their son, ever. I would. I just don’t think the fifth
game in a season for Xander if something that is remarkable for
me and Xander, my family’s life is coming that place. I wouldn’t miss Xander’s
fifth baseball game for a big meeting or a new client. Would I miss it for the
opportunity to close a $78 million deal for our family? Yes, I would.
I just would. And I know one would
say well that’s money. Yeah, but but would I miss
Xander’s championship game after he played baseball every day of
his life for nine years and it was his number one
passion in the world to close a $78 million deal? I don’t know, it’s closer. I wouldn’t say definitely not. I just don’t know,
I mean I don’t know. First of all, if Xander was 13,
Xander at 13 after watching all my business YouTube videos
might want me, I don’t know. Here’s what I would say,
Ernest and everybody else, first and foremost, I would
never judge anybody else’s parenting or process. I have the greatest
relationships in world with my parents and I a lot of things
that were done differently than others and I think we all have. But knock on wood, I think
there’s a far more interesting question maybe
5 to 7 years from now. So far, I’m rolling. There’s been nothing even
remotely intense that I can think of that I’ve missed. They’ve been micro little play
this, play that, you know, last day of school like
a teacher conference. Yeah, there’s been a couple
little things that are like kind of lightweight. They’re also very, very young
right now but so far nothing. I haven’t had to pick. Everything that I felt, I missed
a lot of business things that are solid business things that
I’ve missed because I wanted to be there for the first day
of school or you know the Tot Shabbat day that’s the one
time Xander gets to do that in little Temple Israel
school that he went to. There’s single little things like that but it’s
weighing things. It’s weighing things and I’m not
crippled by the current state of political correctness of how
you parent because news alert, my friends, it’s going to be
different in 15 years and it was different 15 years ago. Yeah, thank you. – Tot Shabbat?
– Tot Shabbat is cute.

6:53

– Hi GaryVee. – Hi GaryVee and Simon, hope all is well. Question that I have for y’all is, can somebody’s personal why, on why they work for a business vary from the business’s why, or is that just never good? Thanks a lot, keep climbing. – So, if it’s your business, the business’s why […]

– Hi GaryVee. – Hi GaryVee and Simon,
hope all is well. Question that
I have for y’all is, can somebody’s personal why,
on why they work for a business vary from the business’s why,
or is that just never good? Thanks a lot, keep climbing. – So, if it’s your business,
the business’s why and your why are
exactly the same thing. – Yeah, but he’s asking if he
works for an organization– – If he works for
a separate company. – He knows the organization’s
why, I mean a lot of people– – He knows the
organization’s why– – A lot of them know
Vayner’s why, but they may have separate
whys within it. Can they co-exist? – Sure. – Can an employee’s
why and an org’s why co-exist, and everybody wins? – Sure. The simple answer is,
yes if they go together. Everybody has their
own unique why, and the organization
has its own unique why. And if they are compatible– – You mean go together in
a peanut butter and jelly kind of metaphor.
– Yeah. If they’re compatible, then
you will look to the people who have joined
the company and say, “Ah, you’re good fit,
you belong here.” And they will see
themselves as a good fit, and each one is
mutually beneficial. In other words,
it’s like any relationship. You and your wife
have different whys, but they’re compatible. You see her as–
– A hundred percent. – Helping you grow,
and she sees you as– – Hundred percent.
– Helping her grow, etc. It’s the exact same thing. – Which is why– – And sometimes it isn’t
compatible, just by– – Which is why divorce
rates are very high. – Well I don’t know,
it’s sometimes incompatible. That’s a decision
making problem. – Okay. But it’s also an evolution
problem right? Like, if you think about it,
one’s whys can be really aligned with the
organization’s today, and five years from
now they may not. – No, absolutely not. Not if both– – One more time. You’re saying no to that? – No to that. – So you’re saying
that there’s a frozen– – Here, let me tell you why. – No, no hold on before you do, I wanna give you
more framework because I’m fascinated by your
decision to say that. You’re saying that things
are frozen, frozen! And that one’s context
of how the world… For example, that it’s so
frozen both North Stars, that one who’s an employee
who’s rolling quite along, and has a why, but then
his child dies from cancer along the way, isn’t
reframed into the context of where maybe it’s
not aligned anymore. – No.
– Okay. – The word,
I wouldn’t use frozen. You’re saying that there can be no growth when
you use the word frozen. Your why is fully formed
by the time you’re in your probably late teens, and the
rest of your life is simply an opportunity to
live in balance with your why or not, so
the decisions you make. And so, whether
somebody’s living, that’s why I said before
which is as long as both organization and person are
working hard to remain in consistent with their
cause then it works fine. Now, the example you give
of someone’s child dying, you know, tragedy doesn’t
form or change your why. Tragedy usually gives us an
opportunity to live our why because it makes everything
else in the world seem stupid, and it forces us to say there is something bigger and
more important here. Very often tragedy
pushes us into why, not the other way around,
not pushes us away from it. – I totally agree with you. I think the most extreme
things that happen in people’s lives actually
just accentuates the reality of what’s going on.
– It’s accentuates of who you really are.
– Hundred percent. – The test of someone is not
when everything is going great, it’s when everything goes wrong. That’s where your
true colors show. – Or, similar to that, but
a slightly different version for everybody, I’m
fascinated by people’s wealth and fame really not
changing them at all, just finally exposing
who they actually are. And that’s not a tragedy.
– And that’s a hard thing – It’s usually in theory,
a good thing. – That’s a hard thing.
– But it’s a real thing. – Absolutely.
– Alright. – It’s fine if they’re
different, as long as they’re compatible. And this is why you
wanna know your why, and this is why you wanna
find out the company’s why, because otherwise you’re
going to make decisions based on money and benefits,
and then there’s nothing. – A hundred percent. – It’s like making a decision
about who to marry based on– – I don’t wanna
side-track the show, but it’s funny I’m sitting here, it’s why I’m so confident
in what I’m building at VaynerMedia because the
platform is being built to be in their benefit to
reverse engineer what they want
based on their DNA. Whether that is
enormous ambition, which is then this is a platform
for them to create that, or within a very
close ecosystem to me, or quite passive and
very nice work life. I have actual
zero emotion, one way or the other
of what they actually want. I just wanna build a
framework and a platform that gives them those
options, and I think that’s the great mistake that
most businesses make. – And isn’t that what you
preach in your work as well? – A hundred percent. I have no interest in– – So the why is clear
internally and externally? – Hundred percent. – I love that. – Which is what, because
to me, otherwise everything crumbles in its hypocrisy
if you don’t do that. – Amen.

29:30

“do you believe we find ourselves or create ourselves?” – That’s a deep question. How self-aware do you think you are if I asked you that? – Very. – Me too. – Very. – Who do you think is more self-aware, me or you? – Me. (group laughter) – [Gary] You know what I feel. […]

“do you believe we find
ourselves or create ourselves?” – That’s a deep question. How self-aware do you think
you are if I asked you that? – Very.
– Me too. – Very. – Who do you think is
more self-aware, me or you? – Me.
(group laughter) – [Gary] You know what I feel.
You know what I feel. – I think you think it’s you.
– [Gary] Of course. I genuinely think I’m the
most self-aware person on Earth. – Right, right,
I don’t know, Gary. I’m waking up at
3 o’clock in the morning. – I’m texting you at 2:53
tomorrow morning and I haven’t even gone
to sleep yet. (group laughter) – Well, I did go to sleep. – That’s a really nice
question, what you think? – I believe, I believe that
in our book we just came out “Average Skill,
Phenomenal Will”– – [Gary] Is that
your first book? – Third book. – [Gary] How are
you in book world? You good at it?
– Yeah, we’re good at it. – [CJ] Very good.
– Very good. – How good?
– [CJ] Underground. – What do you mean underground? – Garage.
– Really? Self published from
the garage? Like, what? Open up the trunk and
selling it from the back? – Absolutely.
– Love it. – [CJ] And online. – I know. I’m kidding. Have you ever considered
going main publishing? – [CJ] We have but we
didn’t like the numbers. I’ll be honest, when we started
out we had such a big following that a ton of supporters right
off the bat said we’ll buy this as soon as it
comes out at $25.99– – Yeah. You’re like why go
share it with other people? – [CJ] You’re right.
They’re like $4 a book. We’re like, yeah
we’ll go over here. – [Gary] Yeah,
totally understand. – So for us, in our third book,
“Average Skill, Phenomenal Will” underdog we believe that you
don’t have to have phenomenal skill but if you have a
phenomenal will you’re not going to quit, you’re not going to
stop, you’ll be successful the very first chapter, this is why
I think I’m more serious about it, the very first
chapter is self-awareness. The very first chapter. – Really? Because you know
what’s funny about my book, talk about who’s more serious. I put self-awareness in
my mother fucking title. I put it in my title. You got chapters, I got titles. You got chapters, I got titles. – Yeah, you got on the cover.
He’s got it on the cover. – I think it’s a really
interesting question. I think that’s one that we’ll
never really fully figure out. I’m always wondering
was this my destiny or did I mentally create it? I think it’s a very fine line. I definitely think
there’s elements of both. – Absolutely. – And I’m a big
believer in momentum. I’m sure as you
started feeling it– – Oh yeah. – momentum is real. I do think a lot of things like
I think a lot about sports and you see that athlete who matured
a little bit late, right, had a big second year and
then all of a sudden it’s like wait a minute. You know what’s funny,
I started a sports agency called VaynerSports.
We just started. We’re recruiting kids. I’m talking to these kids when did you think you
could be a pro? Right, they’re like juniors
right now seniors about to come out. And a lot of them were like after this one game my
sophomore year. – Wow. – Like multiple people said it.
– After one game? – One big game, right, or when
my homie went to the league and I was dogging him in practice. I’m like, wait a minute,
Jerome’s going to the league? – That underdog.
– Yeah. But what’s interesting what I’m
trying to make the connection is when they said that, when
they made the decision that they could go in to the league,
everything changed. They worked out more,
they played better, they ate better, they went down to one
girlfriend instead of seven. My one man I was
dying when he said that. But it’s funny, it was the
mental decision that created their actions.
– Absolutely. – I got my health together two
years ago, it was a mental game, then I got there, now I’m there. – Yep.
– It’s very mental. – It is. – I don’t think we talk about
the brain enough in our society and I think that’s going to be a
big subject that we’ll discover and I think people will look
back at some of the things we talk about and others 100 years
from now and be like wow, they were early on to understanding
how much the brain could do versus all the
other intangibles. – Absolutely. Yep. – Alright, ET, you get to
ask the question of the day.

1 2 3 14